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Energy Stuff - Solar Systems, Solar System Repairs, New Systems, Upgrades & Monitoring

Vic Solar PV rebates are closed and will re-open on 1 July 2019

Vic Solar PV rebates are closed and will re-open on 1 July 2019

All solar PV eligibility and rebate applications lodged before applications closed will continue to be processed by Solar Victoria, in line with current requirements. 

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If you have submitted an eligibility application and you haven’t received an eligibility number, wait until you receive an email from VIC Solar confirming your eligibility number before installation. 
 
If you have already received an eligibility number and haven’t installed your system, you can continue to get a system installed and then apply for a rebate.  
 
If you have submitted a rebate application, it will continue to be processed, in line with current requirements. 
 
If you have not received an eligibility number before you have installed a solar PV system you CANNOT APPLY FOR VIC REBATE, even after applications re-open on 1 July. 

If you are considering installing solar PV with a rebate and have not yet applied to Solar Victoria, you will now need to wait until applications open again on 1 July 2019. After this time, you MUST have received eligibility confirmation before installing your system to be eligible to receive a rebate. 

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Interest- Free Loans 

  • As part of the Solar Homes program a loan scheme will commence for solar PV systems for owner-occupiers from July 2019. This will allow Victorians to access the benefits of renewable energy at no up-front cost. 
  • Eligible households will be able to install solar panels on their home, saving households hundreds of dollars a year on their energy bills. 
  • Renters will be able to access an interest-free loan for a solar PV system when the renters program commences in mid-2019. 
  • Households will be required to pay back the amount of the loan over four years, which will assist Victorians with budgeting for their cost of living. 
  • Households who choose to access the solar PV rebate before the loans scheme opens in July 2019 will not be able to apply for the interest-free loan. 
  • Solar Victoria is responsible for delivering the Solar Homes package and will provide further details on the interest-free loans in the coming months. 

If you would like more information about the Solar Homes program, register for updates or call 1300 363 744. 

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SOLAR FOR RENTERS 

The government is investing $82 million over 10 years to provide 50,000 rebates on solar panels for Victorian renters.  

  • To be eligible for the rebate and interest-free loans, landlords will need to strike an agreement with their tenants to share the costs of installation. 
  • Under the program, renters will make a 25 per cent contribution toward the cost of installation through a small levy on rent spread over four years, with the government and the landlord to cover the rest. For example, for a $4,000 solar panel system, the government will cover half ($2000), the landlord will invest $1,000 over time, and the renters will pay a small monthly levy over four years that will total the remaining $1000. 

The installation of solar panels is expected to save a typical Victorian household $890 on their electricity bill every year, while landlords will benefit by getting panels at low cost. 

Owners corporations will also be eligible. In order to receive the 50 per cent rebate and no-interest loan, they will need to demonstrate that the benefits of installing solar panels will be passed on to tenants. 

Solar Victoria is responsible for delivering the Solar Homes package and will provide further details on the program for renters and landlords in the coming  

SOLAR BATTERY REBATE 

From 1 July 2019, the Solar Homes program will introduce rebates for up to half the value of the installation of a battery storage unit for 10,000 households that already have solar panels installed. 

  • Eligible homeowners will be able to save up to $4,838 on this installation. This will save households with an average 11kWh battery around $650 a year on their electricity bills, in addition to savings they are already making with solar panels. This will also pave the way for future microgrids, allowing households in a local area to share their stored power to lower electricity prices even further. 
  • Victorians with a household income of up to $180,000 who live in their own home valued at up to $3 million are eligible for these rebates. 
  • Homeowners will only be eligible for one rebate across the Solar Homes program. 
  • Solar Victoria is responsible for delivering the Solar Homes package and will provide further details on the batteries program, including eligibility, in the coming months. 

If live in Victoria and you are interested in buying Solar Panels, we encourage you to read the updates on VIC rebates and or call Energy Stuff to discuss further on 1300 656 205. 

 July 1, Victorians using our quoting system will see the following message when requesting quotes

Have you applied for the Victorian Rebate before the 12th APRIL 2019? 

HAVE YOU APPLIED FOR THE VIC REBATE AND BEEN ISSUED WITH AN ELIGIBILITY NUMBER? 

If you have already applied for the Victorian rebate and have an eligibility number confirmed by the government, you can certainly go ahead and get quotes from us and book your installation. We are only happy to move forward if we are confident that you have done your part in enquiring and been issued an eligibility number. This means that if we install your system prior to the 1st of July 2019, we are confident that you will receive your rebate from the government. 

Chat with us now on 1300 656 205.

YOU HAVENT APPLIED FOR THE VIC REBATE AND YOU DON’T HAVE AN ELIGIBILITY NUMBER? 

If you have not applied for the Victorian rebate and you are interested in the rebate, please note that the applications for the Vic Solar rebate has been closed as of 12th April 2019 and will re-open on the 1st July. 

We advise that you WAIT until the applications are open on the 1st July 2019. We will also advise and make sure we do not go ahead and install a system and risk you missing out on the Victorian Rebate between now and the 1st July without an eligibility number. If you go ahead with a solar company and install the system without the eligibility number you will not be able to claim the rebate. 

Again, if unsure, please call our office on 1300 656 205.

Energy Stuff specialises in Residential Solar with emphasis on Repairs, Replacements and upgrades. We also provide new systems, battery storage, Small Commercial, Off-Grid systems and smart monitoring systems. Energy Stuff only uses CEC accredited installers and we fully comply with the Victorian Govt. Solar Rebate Program.

For further information please call us on 1300 656 205 or go to our website at http://www.energystuff.com.au

Solis celebrates another milestone!

The first string inverter company listed on the Shenzhen Stock Exchange

Reposted by PowerArk Solar / Original Source

Ginlong (Solis) has recently celebrated their accomplishment in being listed on the Shenzhen stock exchange as a public company. Being the first of its kind, the China-based company Solis, is the only stock listed company with the main business in the string inverted sector. Founded in 2005, Ginlong Solis has flourished to be a leading high-level technical research and development team, many of whom are deemed experts within the PV systems field. Until today, Solis’ stock value is over 4 billion RMB and will continue to prosper, which will further build the company’s rapport and credibility internationally.

Landing the stock code: 300763, Ginlong Solis technologies is publicly offering 20 million shares, including 20 IPO shares offered at approximately 26.64 Yuan per share.

Solis has distributed products to more than 80 countries around the globe. Their brand strategy focal point has always outlined product reliability and performance advantage against competitors. The top ten customers for Solis are mostly from Asia, Europe, United States of America, Australia and many more regions and countries throughout the world.

What does this mean for their business?

By going public on the Shenzhen stock exchange, this opportunity has given Solis the platform they needed to expand as a brand internationally. From this, the market will push the brand Solis to more countries around the globe. Having IPOs (initial public offerings) available means that Solis will have the ability to invest more frugally in new products for the Australian market. Solis is a business that customers can place their trust in and rely on for a long time. More solar research and innovation can come into the Australian solar industry via this new change, aiding and growing our current market.More and more business will grow from this positive action which will in the long term, give Solis the credibility and global recognition they need to prosper further into the trusted Australian Solar market. Australian’s will have the opportunity to invest in a well-known and trusted brand, bringing prosperities onto Australian soil.

Energy Stuff specialises in Residential Solar with emphasis on Repairs, Replacements and upgrades. We also provide new systems, battery storage, Small Commercial, Off-Grid systems and smart monitoring systems. Energy Stuff only uses CEC accredited installers and we fully comply with the Victorian Govt. Solar Rebate Program.

For further information please call us on 1300 656 205 or go to our website at http://www.energystuff.com.au

‘Blown away’: rooftop solar PV installations surge by almost half

Written by Peter Hannam / The Age / 14th April 2019

Australian rooftops added a record of almost 500 megawatts of new solar photovoltaic capacity in the March quarter, as Victoria’s incentive scheme stoked a 90 per cent increase in that state’s installations.

record of almost 500 megawatts of new solar photovoltaic capacity in the March quarter, as Victoria’s incentive scheme stoked a 90 per cent increase in that state’s installations.

Data gathered by Green Energy Markets show the sector added about 45 per cent more capacity of solar PV – in systems of 100 kilowatts or smaller in size – compared with the January-March period a year earlier.

“It’s usually a little bit slow in January and February but [previous records] have really been blown away,” said Tristan Edis, director of analysis at Green Energy Markets, a consultancy firm.

The first-quarter installations of about 482MW were led by Victoria, where the Daniel Andrews government’s $2250 rebate per unit helped propel that state above sunnier neighbours Queensland and NSW.

Green Energy Markets expects solar PV capacity on rooftop will top 2000MW this year, or about a quarter more than the previous record annual total achieved just last year.

Apart from the Victoria fillip for the PV market, consumers remain wary of high power prices since few have seen much relief from retailers. “That’s reinforcing the momentum,” Mr Edis said.

The additional solar panels added during the first quarter will deliver their owners a reduction in bills of more than $850 million over the next decade based on current electricity prices, he said.

The ongoing rally in renewable energy is greater in large-scale solar and wind farms, with more than 8100MW under construction. Victoria is also grabbing the lion’s share of the 20,000-plus jobs generated by these projects.

According to Green Energy Markets, Victoria has created 7580 jobs from the wind and solar farms being built. That tally is more than 52 per cent greater than the number of similar jobs in Queensland and almost double those being generated in NSW.

In March, renewable energy sources supplied about 19.7 per cent, or 3839 gigawatt-hours, of the electricity to the country’s main grids, the consultancy said. That supply was enough to power about 9.5 million homes, and saved the equivalent of about 2.7 million tonnes of carbon-dioxide.

The installation of small-scale solar PV totalled more than 23,000 last month, with the average size of residential units reaching 6.6 kilowatts. That section of the market employed some 7857 people in March, with Victoria’s 2134 pipping those in NSW and Queensland, with about 2000 in both.

If the rate of rooftop installations were to continue until 2022, the forecast extra generation of more than 10,000 gigawatt hours would alone top the annual electricity generated by AGL’s Liddell coal-fired power station. The Hunter Valley plant is scheduled to shut down that year.

The growth of the renewables sector could slow sharply in coming years without clearer energy policy, particularly at a national level.

The Australian Energy Market Operator has lately signalled it will penalise large-scale wind and solar projects that are being built in areas where there is limited grid capacity to absorb more.

The Renewable Energy Target, which has been the main support for new large-scale generation in recent years, may yet be met ahead of its 2020 goal.

Federal Labor backs the Turnbull government’s National Energy Guarantee as the overarching policy to replace the RET, while the Coalition is promising to help underwrite new generation capacity if re-elected.

Energy Stuff specialises in Residential Solar with emphasis on Repairs, Replacements and upgrades. We also provide new systems, battery storage, Small Commercial, Off-Grid systems and smart monitoring systems. Energy Stuff only uses CEC accredited installers and we fully comply with the Victorian Govt. Solar Rebate Program.

For further information please call us on 1300 656 205 or go to our website at http://www.energystuff.com.au

How to get the most out of your home solar panels

Written by Alice Clarke / The Age / 10 April 2019

It is a truth (almost) universally acknowledged that having your own solar panels in this sunburnt country of ours will make your power bill cheaper, and give you that warm sense of greenie superiority.

But most people with solar panels actually have no idea how much energy they’re producing, whether they’re getting the most out of their system, or how much electricity their household actually consumes. So, here are my tips on how to get the most from your panels.

The first thing that’s drilled into us when we pay the thousands of dollars to put solar on our roof is that we have to keep them clean. It makes sense: a dirty panel is an inefficient panel. However, unless you live in an extremely dusty area, with no rain, and birds who not only have gastro-intestinal difficulties but an outright vendetta against you; you’re probably fine.

If you can easily get on your roof, just hose them off once a year or so before summer, and maybe rub them down with a soft cloth or sponge if there are any stubborn stains. If you can’t get up there, some window washers offer solar panel cleaning as a service. But the rain will probably take care of them for you anyway.

The main thing you have to worry about is debris. If a plastic bag or something gets caught on the side of a panel, you lose the whole panel until it’s uncovered. Worse still, if all your panels are connected, you’ll lose even more output.

To that end, shade is your worst enemy, because if part of a panel is shaded the whole thing can become useless. So keep an eye on any trees you have around your property.

The best way to make sure your system is working properly is to monitor the output. Your electricity bill isn’t going to be very useful for this, because it can’t tell you how much of the solar power you’re using before selling back to the grid. Same goes for your inverter’s web portal.

There are a couple of different ways around that: you can get a battery, which is very expensive, but means you might be able to get rid of your power bills completely, depending on where you live and the size of your roof. Batteries come with apps that tell you all about the efficiency of your panels and what goes in and out.

A cheaper option than a battery is to spend a couple of hundred dollars on a home energy management system, which records the flow of energy into your home and sends messages to let you know when you need to perform maintenance, or if your panels aren’t performing as well as other connected panels in the area.

Another option is using DC Power Co’s app. DC is a power company based in Melbourne which only services solar users, and the app that comes with its plans does roughly the same thing as the home energy management system. But you’ll need to decide if its energy plans are right for you.

On the topic of power companies, make sure you choose the plan that suits your needs, and don’t just look at the solar plans. It’s surprising how many electricity companies charge solar users higher daily fees, as well as increased electricity usage charges. Not to mention the wildly different (and ridiculously low) feed-in tariffs. Shop around, and don’t be afraid to ask your power company for a better deal, especially if you can back up your request with numbers from its other plans.

Energy Stuff specialises in Residential Solar with emphasis on Repairs, Replacements and upgrades. We also provide new systems, battery storage, Small Commercial, Off-Grid systems and smart monitoring systems. Energy Stuff only uses CEC accredited installers and we fully comply with the Victorian Govt. Solar Rebate Program.

For further information please call us on 1300 656 205 or go to our website at http://www.energystuff.com.au

Queensland enacts new solar rules, as stunned industry warns of investment standstill

Written by Sophie Vorrath / RenewEconomy / 10 April 2019

The Queensland government has confirmed plans to put in place controversial new regulations for solar farm construction in the state that will restrict the installation or removal of PV panels to licensed electricians.

In a media statement dispatched late on Tuesday afternoon, Queensland’s minister for industrial relations, Grace Grace, said the new code of practice  would allow only licensed electricians to mount, locate, fix or remove solar panels on projects of 100kW and above would become law on May 13.

The new rule, which came to RenewEconomy’s attention on Monday, has been slammed by industry groups as excessive, unnecessary, and potentially devastating to developers, due to the “large and sharp increase” in electricians that would be required for solar farm construction.

One solar developer told RE that is was “akin to requiring an electrician to come and plug in your kettle every time you want to make a cup of tea.”

And in a statement on Wednesday, the Clean Energy Council formalised its objections to the rule change, arguing it would will cost local jobs and slow the rollout of large-scale solar in Australia’s Sunshine State, which has a huge pipeline of more than 20GW of large scale solar projects waiting for development.

Numerous solar developers and contractors were stunned by the news broken by RenewEconomy, and asked to see details of the proposed legislation. “Were very unhappy,” one said.

CEC director of energy generation, Anna Freeman, expressed her organisation’s astonishment at the new rules, and even made her own household appliance comparison.

“It’s the equivalent of a homeowner having to call an electrician as soon as they’ve unpacked a new television from the box, in order to hang it on the wall,” she said.

“The government has not demonstrated why this new regulation – which risks hundreds of local jobs and could bring some projects to a standstill – is even necessary.”

In her statement, Minister Grace said the new rule had come in response to stakeholder concerns that unlicensed workers, including backpackers and labourers, were mounting and removing “live” solar panels.

“Solar panels generate power as soon as they are exposed to light and cannot be isolated while they are being mounted,” she said.

“Workers are at risk from electrocution and fires if solar panels are not properly earthed during installation.

“Removing panels can be even more dangerous. These are not jobs for unlicensed workers.”

But solar developers have described this rationale as “daft” and said there was no electrical work involved in mounting and demounting panels, an argument reiterated by the CEC.

“There is zero electrical work involved in this task and as such there is no need to require an electrician to do it,” said Freeman.

“The existing regulations already ensure that an electrician carries out the electrical cabling and earth testing, which is the next step in the construction process.”

In turn, the Electrical Trades Union, has slammed the CEC’s response to the rule change as “hysterical” and “misleading,” while at the same time comparing current working conditions on solar farms to the Wild West.

“For the CEC to talk about projects coming to a grinding halt is not helpful and does little to improve perceptions that the CEC and major players in the solar industry put profits before people,” said ETU Queensland State Secretary Peter Ong.

“We the ETU have been on the front foot raising the issues about the dangers of using unlicensed workers such as backpackers and other unskilled workers on these farms.

“It was literally like the wild west where workers were picked up from backpackers and driven to the sites similar to a mango or banana farm, it was an accident waiting to happen,” he said.

Ong also warned that a failure to tighten safety standards in this way could lead to industry fall-out similar to the high-profile collapse of RCR Tomlinson who – he said – “were trapped in a race to the bottom on costs.”

But solar insiders argue that the rule change is more likely to make matters worse in an industry already facing problems of grid congestion, network connection delays, the reduction and variations in marginal loss factors, and lack of policy certainty.

“(This rule) will result in fewer jobs for locals on new clean energy projects, more fly-in, fly-out workers, and increased pressure on the availability of electricians throughout Queensland,” said CEC’s Freeman.

“The process followed has been rushed and poorly communicated and should have progressed through a proper regulatory impact assessment process, as per the government’s own guidelines for regulatory change.

“Other solutions which should have been considered include a system where a single licensed electrician supervises a team of workers, which is the case in the rooftop solar industry.

“We urge the Queensland Government to rethink this rushed requirement before inflicting significant and unnecessary damage on the large-scale solar industry and the thousands of regional workers whose livelihoods depend on this growing industry,” she said.

Energy Stuff specialises in Residential Solar with emphasis on Repairs, Replacements and upgrades. We also provide new systems, battery storage, Small Commercial, Off-Grid systems and smart monitoring systems. Energy Stuff only uses CEC accredited installers and we fully comply with the Victorian Govt. Solar Rebate Program.

For further information please call us on 1300 656 205 or go to our website at http://www.energystuff.com.au

Federal Budget 2019: Expanded tax breaks for Australia’s small, medium businesses

Written by Clancy Yeates / The Age / 2 April 2019

Thousands of small and medium businesses will receive tax breaks on purchases of new equipment, as the government seeks to bolster investment in the economy’s “engine room”.

In a budget that also highlighted future tax cuts for small businesses, Treasurer Josh Frydenberg expanded the instant asset write-off, so that it can now be claimed by medium businesses with turnover up to $50 million a year, up from a previous $10 million limit.

The threshold for the tax perk — which allows businesses to write off assets against their taxable income — is also being lifted, from $25,000 per asset to $30,000.

The government said the changes, projected to cost the budget $400 million over four years, will mean an extra 22,000 businesses are able to claim the tax break.

Mr Frydenberg said the write-off could be claimed every time a business bought an eligible asset worth less than $30,000, such as when a plumber bought new tools, or a cafe owner purchased a fridge.

“Small businesses are the engine room of our economy,” he said in his budget speech.

“They are integral to every local community. People running a small business put their livelihoods on the line. We want small businesses to prosper, and we are backing them to do so.”

Under one case study presented by the government, a hypothetical nursery employing five people would be able to write off the purchase of two vans under the scheme, instead of depreciating the assets. As a result, the business would save on tax and improve its cash flow by $13,500. A hypothetical business with 60 staff could boost its cash flow by $30,800 by buying 10 commercial ovens, a budget document says.

As a result of the changes, the government says a total of 3.4 million small and medium businesses will now be eligible for the tax perk.

Budget documents also highlighted that the corporate tax rate for companies with annual turnover of less than $50 million will fall from 27.5 per cent this year, to 26 per cent in 2020-12, and 25 per cent in 2012-22.

Businesses are also being offered larger cash payments for taking on apprentices where there are skills shortage, the centrepiece of a $525 million skills package, but the budget had a tougher message for some larger businesses, such as banks and multinational corporations.

After the Hayne royal commission exposed a series of rip-offs by financial institutions, there was an extra $607 million to fund the government’s response to the inquiry, as announced last month.

This included an extra $405 million for the Australian Securities and Investments Commission, which has pledged to be more aggressive in taking companies and individuals to court, after it was criticised for being too lenient. The Australian Prudential Regulation Authority will receive an extra $145 million for priority areas such as improving governance and remuneration practices in banks. There will also be extra funding to resolve past disputes between customers and banks. The extra spending will be partially funded by higher levies to be imposed by regulators on the financial sector, the budget said.

The budget is also expected to raise an extra $3.6 billion in revenue over four years by extending a tax crackdown on multinationals and the very wealthy.

The Australian Taxation Office will receive an extra $1 billion over four years to expand a tax avoidance taskforce that targets multinational businesses, large companies, trusts and “high wealth” individuals.

Energy Stuff specialises in Residential Solar with emphasis on Repairs, Replacements and upgrades. We also provide new systems, battery storage, Small Commercial, Off-Grid systems and smart monitoring systems. Energy Stuff only uses CEC accredited installers and we fully comply with the Victorian Govt. Solar Rebate Program.

For further information please call us on 1300 656 205 or go to our website at http://www.energystuff.com.au

Home solar energy trading platform coming near you after funding boost

Written by Cole Latimer / The Sydney Morning Herald / 5 April 2019

Main image: The platform lets households with solar systems trade their excess energy in an online marketplace. CREDIT: JUSTIN MCMANUS

An online marketplace designed to let households trade their excess solar power has received the backing of the government renewable energy agency.

Greensync has been given $10 million by the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) to accelerate the deployment of its ‘deX’ energy trading system.

The deX platform allows multiple household rooftop solar systems, batteries, smart appliances and even plugged-in electric cars to be accessed by the network operator to push power back into the grid when needed, turning homes into virtual power plants.

“Studies indicate that virtual power plants could account for 700 megawatts of capacity by 2022 and consumer-owned distributed energy – rooftop solar panels and battery systems – could account for up to 45 per cent of all generation within two decades,” ARENA chief executive Darren Miller said.

Greensync said deX also acted as a marketplace, where anyone registered with solar and batteries can trade their excess power based on current electricity prices, demand and availability.

“It’s an exciting step in unlocking extra value for energy asset owners,” Greensync chief executive Phil Blythe said.

ARENA’s funding will support Greensync’s wider $32 million rollout across Australia and the world.

The deX platform has close to 100 organisation and utility partners using the software across 20 countries. It was used in South Australia by Simply Energy and South Australian Power Networks (SAPN) to run an 8-megawatt virtual power plant trial, also funded by ARENA.

This $23 million program used the solar and battery systems of about 1200 Adelaide homes to create a virtual power plant.

Energy Stuff specialises in Residential Solar with emphasis on Repairs, Replacements and upgrades. We also provide new systems, battery storage, Small Commercial, Off-Grid systems and smart monitoring systems. Energy Stuff only uses CEC accredited installers and we fully comply with the Victorian Govt. Solar Rebate Program.

For further information please call us on 1300 656 205 or go to our website at http://www.energystuff.com.au

Batteries are key to clean energy — and they just got much cheaper

Written by Eric Holthaus / Grist / 3 April 2019

Batteries are critical for our clean energy future. Luckily, their cost has dropped so low, we might be much closer to this future than we previously thought.

In a little less than a year, the cost of lithium-ion batteries has fallen by 35 percent, according to a new Bloomberg New Energy Finance report. Cheaper batteries mean we can store more solar and wind power even when the sun isn’t shining or wind isn’t blowing. This is a major boost to renewables, helping them compete with fossil fuel-generated power, even without subsidies in some places, according to the report. Massive solar-plus-storage projects are already being built in places like Florida and California to replace natural gas, and many more are on the way.

The new battery prices are “staggering improvements,” according to Elena Giannakopoulou, who leads the energy economics group at Bloomberg NEF. Previous estimates anticipated this breakthrough moment for batteries to arrive in late 2020, not early 2019.

According to the report, the cost of wind and solar generation is also down sharply — by between 10 to 24 percent since just last year, depending on the technology. These numbers are based on real projects under construction in 46 countries around the world.

The lower battery prices have big implications for electric cars, too. There’s a key cost threshold of about $100 per kilowatt hour, the point at which electric vehicles would be cheap enough to quickly supplant gasoline. At this rate, we’ll reach that in less than five years.

Now that cheap batteries are finally here, we’re well on our way to electric modes of transportation and always-on renewable energy — and not a moment too soon.

What’s driving the plunge? Giannakopoulou cites “technology innovation, economies of scale, stiff price competition and manufacturing experience.” Other storage methods, like pumped hydro, still account for the vast majority of energy storage capacity, but lithium-ion batteries are much more flexible and don’t require specific locations or environmental conditions to work. Like everything in the built environment, lithium-ion batteries also require mining and manufacturing. There’s still a chance that some new exotic battery technology will quickly supplant lithium-ion, but its ubiquity and — now — cheapness will be hard to beat.

Electric vehicles will become cheaper to own and operate than gas ones. In places like California, Texas, and Germany, electricity prices have occasionally dropped below zero — a sign that the grid wasn’t yet ready to handle the glut of renewable energy produced there. Now, more of that cheap power will be stored and passed on to consumers. This could be the moment when renewable energy starts to shut down fossil fuel for good.

Energy Stuff helps provide battery solutions to residential and small commercial solar systems. Our battery ready systems range from small to very large depending on client needs. There batteries can be internal and external installations with weatherproof storage available.

Call us for further information 1300 656 205 or go to our website at https://ongrid.energystuff.com.au/solar-system-battery-storage/

SA homebuyers are walking on sunshine

Written by Tom Bowden / realestate.com.au / 22 March 2019

SOLAR power is becoming a sought-after feature for househunters who want the clean energy supply contributing to their biggest asset.

According to a realestate.com.au and Origin Energy study, 85 per cent of Australians believe solar panels add value to a property.

About 75 per cent of renters said they would pay more to live in a property with solar energy, while two out of five respondents said they would pay an extra $10 a week.

Realestate.com.au chief economist Nerida Conisbee said while it was difficult to quantify how much value solar power added to a house, most buyers saw it as an attraction.


Rooftop solar panels. Image from istock

“It is something that’s nice to have and will be seen as something that’s increasingly nice to have, given we have rising energy costs and there has been greater work done on batteries,” Ms Conisbee said.

“The environment is certainly a consideration for some people, but I think the pricing issue is the major attraction.

“If you can say to someone that by living in this house your energy costs are going to be negligible – that is a very powerful statement.”

Separate data shows there were 4509 searches carried out on realestate.com.au for either the keywords “solar” or “solar panels”.

“It clearly is something people are searching specifically for – the ability to be self-sufficient is really desirable for a lot of people,” Ms Conisbee said.

“One of the challenges is people have solar power and are feeding it back into the grid, but the amount they are getting paid is still highly variable, so there’s not a whole lot of confidence that their investment in panels will pay off in energy bills.

Real Estate Institute of South Australia chief executive Greg Troughton said solar panels were quickly moving from being a “nice to have” to a “must have”.

“With SA’s exorbitant power prices, people are seeing value in anything that might help offset minimise or offset those costs,” he said.


Two contractors installing solar panels on a rooftop. Pic: iStock

Jesse and Amy Sumner recently installed a 29-panel 8.4kW system at their Mt Barker home. Mr Sumner, 31, said their attraction to solar was purely financial.

“The return on investment was worth it,” he said.

“In summer, we don’t pay any electrical bill and in winter we have an extremely reduced electrical bill.

“It should pay itself off in under five years – a 20 per cent return on investment is certainly worth it.”

The family hopes to add a battery to the system in the future.

Energy Stuff provides a full range of new smart solar systems which can include battery ready inverters or systems with integrated battery storage. All our systems come with smart energy management to provide real time monitoring and energy efficiencies. Finance options can be arranged. For further information call 1300 656 205 or go to our website at

https://ongrid.energystuff.com.au/new-solar-system/

Australia’s transport pollution from cars and trucks is soaring

Written by Bridie Schmidt / The Driven / April 1st 2019

A damning report from international research firm Climate Analytics is lending substantial weight to the argument that Australia needs to improve its scorecard on clean transport.

Pollution from light passenger vehicles and heavy transport is soaring, the report shows, up 57% in 2017 since 1990 and projected to rise to 82% from 1990 levels by the end of the decade.

Cars are the worst offenders, with CO2 levels emitted by passenger vehicles increasing 25% from 1990 to 2017 and accounting for the majority of CO2 levels overall.

Heavy trucks and utes/vans combined account for an equal amount of CO2 emissions as cars, with both doubling in emissions from 1990 – 2017.

Aviation, while accounting for a much smaller proportion of CO2 emissions, increased by an incredible 235% from 1990 – 2017.

The rapidly rising levels of CO2 are due to a lack of strict fuel emissions regulations that now govern 80 per cent of light vehicles globally.

The USA, China, Japan, India and the EU have all improved fuel emissions, with the EU leading the way followed closely by India.

While the USA’s auto market is most closely compared to Australia’s in terms of segment popularity (eg “pickups” or utes, and SUVs), the USA is far ahead of Australia in terms of grams of CO2 released per kilometre.

In many key indicators considered by the report, such as transport emissions per person, EV market share and access to charging infrastructure, Australia is falling well behind other markets.

The figures, which show that if Australia is to help meet the obligations of the Paris Agreement it must work towards zero emissions transport by 2050, have elicited a call from the Australian Conservation Foundation (ACF) for stricter fuel efficiency standards and a ban on sales of high emissions vehicles.

ACF’s Chief Executive Officer, Kelly O’Shanassy, said in a note that successive governments had dropped the ball on mandatory fuel efficiency standards, incentives to take up electric vehicles and installing charging infrastructure.

The call comes as Australia gears up for an imminent federal election, with a dire need for a purposeful climate change policy fuelling discussion on the state of electric vehicles in Australia.

“Australia has been considering mandatory climate pollution and fuel standards for years and years – but governments have fallen for reckless scare campaigns and shirked implementation.

“As a result, Australia is the only country in the OECD without mandatory climate pollution standards for cars and trucks.“Australia has also been slow to encourage the adoption of electric vehicles and has no national strategy, targets or infrastructure support.

“Countries like China, India and France have started to adopt forward thinking regimes that Australia should follow.”

Just last week the Coalition government confirmed that it would not be releasing a national electric vehicles strategy until mid next year.

The statement has sparked response from opposition party Labor which only this morning announced a new climate policy highlighting an electric vehicle strategy of 50% passenger electric vehicle sales by 2030 and 50% government electric vehicle sales by 20205.

“Countries like China, India and France have started to adopt forward thinking regimes that Australia should follow.”

Just last week the Coalition government confirmed that it would not be releasing a national electric vehicles strategy until mid next year.

The statement has sparked response from opposition party Labor which only this morning announced a new climate policy highlighting an electric vehicle strategy of 50% passenger electric vehicle sales by 2030 and 50% government electric vehicle sales by 20205.

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